Kill the Irishman (2011) – a crime world tale

Last updated on April 2nd, 2018 at 09:30 pm

Well, I never had heard of this movie named Kill the Irishman until a friend of my suggested this as a nice mobster film. I wondered how come I didn’t read about this anywhere on web since its release in 2011.

Nevertheless, as I finally got to watch this, I would recommend straightway knowing the fact that it’s nowhere close to crime genre epic The Godfather (Francis Ford Coppola) or Goodfellas (Martin Scorsese).

Adopted from the book “To Kill the Irishman: The War That Crippled the Mafia” by Rick Porello, Kill the Irishman is yet another crime drama but with a different taste. Director Jonathan Hensleigh very well knows the fact that he is telling a true story and there is no need to go over the top with excessive blood thirst scenes.

Coming to the plot, the movie deals with the biopic of real life Irish-American gangster Danny Greene, who to all surprise of himself muscles into the top of Cleveland’s criminal underworld during the late 1970s.

As the tale of a real life crime figure, it chronicles the story of the life of this proud Irishman living in the brutal neighbourhood of Cleveland and how he becomes a mobster from a regular guy, who was a tireless dock worker before veering into the lane of organized crime.

Ray Stevenson as Danny Greene could have done a slightly better job for such a realistic portrayal. We all know how a fantastic actor he is in the BBC TV series Rome as Titus Pullo and in the film Punisher: War Zone, but Kill the Irishman is not one of his best performances.

In the end, looking at the real life figure, many of us may even wonder if such a person actually lived in that time, and this is the fact that it generates curiosity to more about the life of that person – his rise and fall. All the more, the film was indeed watchable for supporting actors like Christopher Walken, Val Kilmer and Vincent D’Onofrio.

Cinecelluloid

Cinecelluloid

This post has been written, edited and published by the Cinecelluloid editorial team.

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